STUDENT FIRST! News
   

Weekly Update on Education

7 September 2010


Bombay high court blow to state: Private schools can decide own fees
Menaka Rao, Daily News & Analysis, September 2, 2010

The Bombay high court on Wednesday set aside the government resolutions (GRs) formed to regulate fees charged by private unaided schools, stating that they were unconstitutional. As a result, private unaided schools can decide their own fees. A division bench of justices DK Deshmukh and ND Deshpande held that the GRs violate the right to set up an educational institution.The Unaided School’s Forum and the Association of International Schools and Principals Foundation had moved court challenging the state government’s resolve to regulate fees of private schools. The associations said the government’s decision of July 1999 and July 2010 curtails an institution’s autonomy.

More [+]


Enabling cultural expression in schools
Amukta Mahapatra, The Hindu, September 5, 2010

With the schools by and large seen as nodal centres for delivery of content and tukdas of knowledge, the children’s own range of expression is not given due attention. Even within the academic area, reading (taking in what others have written) has more weightage than writing. Most of the work done as writing in schools is merely copying or regurgitating the text. Increasingly, the individual is seen as a consumer and the child is considered a prime target for consuming the products, as an influencing agent in the purchase of commodities, and as a future purchaser in the growing market economy.But what happens to the content the child wants to write, to express, to communicate his thoughts and feelings, his or her responses while interacting with the society s/he is a part of from the time of birth?

More [+]

India Inc goes back to school; not to learn, but earn

P Vinod Kumar, The Financial Express, September 5, 2010

Corporate India seems to have taken a leaf out of the books of cash-flush private equity and venture capital funds as it takes a re-look at the recession-proof education segment. And this time it’s not charity or philanthropy that brings them to classrooms, but the simple formula to keep cash registers ringing. “Education is a $40-billion opportunity waiting to be tapped and Indian corporates have just started realising its potential. Being a counter-cyclical business, it provides insurance against any (economic) downturns and ensure steady returns,” an analyst tracking the sector told FE.

More [+]

UK’s second state-funded Hindu school soon
Deccan Herald, September 6, 2010

The first state-funded Hindu school in Britain, Krishna Avanti Primary School, was set up in 2008 in the London suburb of Harrow. The I-Foundation, the educational charity organisation behind Krishna Avanti Primary School, will also set up the new school in Leicester. The new school is to be launched in 2011. The proposal for the Hindu school in Leicester was one of 16 approved today by the Department for Education as in the running to open in 2011.

.More [+]

School reform’s meager results
Robert J. Samuelson, The Washington Post, September 6, 2010

As 56 million children return to the nation’s 133,000 elementary and secondary schools, the promise of “reform” is again in the air. Education Secretary Arne Duncan has announced $4 billion in “Race to the Top” grants to states whose proposals demonstrate, according to Duncan, “a bold commitment to education reform” and “creativity and innovation [that are] breathtaking.” What they really show is that few subjects inspire more intellectual dishonesty and political puffery than “school reform.”

More [+]

Slammed by own, Sibal gets PM praise
Indian Express, September 5, 2010

After facing embarrassment in the Rajya Sabha where his own partymen attacked him over an education Bill, HRD Minister Kapil Sibal on Saturday received words of praise from PM Manmohan Singh. While the PM commended Sibal for his zealous approach, UPA president Sonia Gandhi is learnt to have agreed to launch 35 new Navodaya school buildings next week.“I pay tribute to my colleague Kapil Sibal for the zeal, dedication and enthusiasm that he has brought to bear on the work of this most important ministry of Union government, that HRD Ministry is,” the PM said in his address to the recipients of National Teachers Awards, to be given away by the President on Sunday.

More [+]

M&M aims educational support to 1 lakh ‘Nanhi Kaliyan’ by 2011
Economic Times, September 5, 2010

Away from the rat race to acquire auto firm in South Korea or pulling out all the stops to take wings in aerospace sector from Australia, Mahindra & Mahindra is quietly turning to support education of underprivileged girls back home. The company, which spends one per cent of its net profit on various welfare schemes for the disadvantaged sections, aims to provide support for education of one lakh girls by next year under a scheme named ‘Nanhi Kali’.

More [+]

Enabling cultural expression in schools
Amukta Mahapatra, The Hindu, September 5, 2010

With the schools by and large seen as nodal centres for delivery of content and tukdas of knowledge, the children’s own range of expression is not given due attention. Even within the academic area, reading (taking in what others have written) has more weightage than writing. Most of the work done as writing in schools is merely copying or regurgitating the text. Increasingly, the individual is seen as a consumer and the child is considered a prime target for consuming the products, as an influencing agent in the purchase of commodities, and as a future purchaser in the growing market economy.But what happens to the content the child wants to write, to express, to communicate his thoughts and feelings, his or her responses while interacting with the society s/he is a part of from the time of birth?

More [+]

Research Paper
How do Government and Private Schools Differ? Findings from two large Indian states

Sangeeta Goyal and Priyanka Pandey

World Bank

ABSTRACT: This paper uses survey data from representative samples of government and private schools in two states of India, Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh, to explore systematic differences between the two school types. We find that private school students have higher test scores than government school students. However, in both private and government schools the overall quality is low and learning gains from one grade to the next are small. There is large variation in the quality of both school types; and observed school and teacher characteristics are weakly correlated with learning outcomes. There is
considerable sorting among students, and those from higher socio-economic strata select into private schools. Private schools have lower pupil-teacher ratios and seven to eight times lower teacher salaries but do not differ systematically in infrastructure and teacher effort from government schools. Most of the variation in teacher effort is within schools and is weakly correlated with observed teacher characteristics such as education, training, experience. After controlling for observed student and school characteristics, the private school advantage over government schools in test scores varies by state, school type and grade. Private unrecognized schools do better than private recognized schools. Given the large salary differential, private schools would clearly be more cost effective even in the case of no absolute difference in test scores.

More [+]

 

Picture of the Week


Prime Minister Manmohan Singh with Human Resource Development Minister Kapil Sibal during a function, on the eve of Teachers Day

 

RTE Coalition

To initiate and continue the discussion amongst concerned groups and individuals on the issue of right of education and monitor the implementation of the RTE Act, an RTE Coalition has been formed. Join the coalition to make universal elementary education a reality in India. Log on to www.righttoeducation.in for more information.

 

 

Student First! Dialogue Series

Topic: National Curriculum: Does one size fit all?

8 September 2010

Casuarina Hall, India Habitat Centre,

New Delhi

For more information

 

2010 Fisher International Memorial Award

James Tooley’s “The Beautiful Tree” bags 2010 Fisher International Memorial Award.
To read more click here

 

SCHOOL VOUCHERS FOR GIRLS

400 girl children from poor families of North East Delhi receive school vouchers for a period of 4 years.
For details visit  website

 

 

Support Children's Right to Education of Choice!
DONATE

For more details on how to support, log on to www.schoolchoice.in or email us at schoolchoice@ccs.in

 


This is our 101st edition. Please give your feedback to make it more useful to you at schoolchoice@ccs.in

Disclaimer: Copyright of the contents of this newsletter remains with the original author/publisher.